What does it mean to be Marxist?

Ideology: Marxism





 

Marxism advocates the creation of a classless, stateless system based on common ownership and free-access, superabundance and maximum freedom for individuals to develop their own capacities and talents.

Marxism was originally created by philosophers Karl Marx and Fredrich Engels in the Communist Manifesto during 1848.

Marxism is the basic form and grandfather of communism.

Marx believed that capitalism, like previous socioeconomic systems, would produce internal tensions which would lead to its destruction.

Marxism is the belief that the bourgeois gain too much power and control everything, while the workers and the proletariats have lost their say in what the country should be doing.

So Marx and Engels believed that the working and middle class (the proletariats) should revolt and overthrow the upper-class (bourgeois) from power because all the proletariats have left to lose is the shirts on their backs and nothing else.

The Manifesto explains that the government should be run by the proletariat for the proletariat and everyone would be paid equally, given equal chances at schools etc. The government would have one ultimate leader and have all of their businesses owned by the government, so that no one business could become too powerful and push out small businesses painfully creating much economic strain on the owners and turning them out to the streets with little chance of survival.

- A Marxist society does not allow an individual to gain wealth; instead, that wealth belongs to the people as a collective. In a 'pure' Marxist society, the state is a democratic system that manages all aspects of production - essentially making the state the head of all industry.

- Marx dreamed of a society where a man could be "A farmer in the morning, a laborer in the afternoon, and a philosopher in the evening" - essentially, a world without specialization and stark divisions of labor.

Resources:

Wikipedia - Marxism

Conservapedia - Marxism

Answers.com - Marxism