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Asked in Category :: General Politics Elections and Campaigns
What is the difference between a primary, caucus and convention?

Anonymous writes...

"I don't understand the differences between a primary and a caucus. Also, what do conventions have to do with anything?"

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Primary: In a primary election, registered voters participate in selecting the candidate for the party's nomination by voting, as in a general election. After the votes are tallied, the number of votes a candidate receives determines the number of delegates they are awarded. Primaries can be either open (you can vote for a candidate outside of your party) or closed (you must be a member of the party to vote for that party's candidate).

Caucus: In a caucus, party members get together in their district or precinct and pledge their support for their favorite presidential candidate, which results in awarding a certain number of delegates to that candidate. The delegates typically state publicly who they are going to vote for, so people can vote accordingly.

Convention: Once the primaries and caucuses are completed in each state, a national convention is held in which a party's nomination for president is formally announced to the public. During the convention, the elected delegates cast their vote for a party candidate and the candidate with the most delegates gets the party's nomination. The end of the convention marks the beginning of the general election process.

Posted by JeffCohen on 06.08.2014 (06.08.2014)
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  •  Anonymous: 
     

    Yea

     
     02.23.2016DeleteEditReply 
    0 points
     
  •  Anonymous: 
     

    So much for by the people. We really do not have much say. 

     
     02.22.2016DeleteEditReply 
    0 points
     
  •  Anonymous: 
     

    In states where the electorate is not bound by law to follow the popular vote, do the voters have any legal recourse in, for example, civil court or even federal court, to protest the electorate not following the popular vote?

     
     12.17.2015DeleteEdit1 replies1 repliesReply 
    2 points
     
  •  Anonymous: 
     

    Once the Primary is over. If a candidate does not win in the party they ran in can he/she switch to lets say a different party like Libertarian or some other open party to run against the Republicans and Democrats in the run off?

     
     08.05.2015DeleteEdit1 replies1 repliesReply 
    -1 point
     
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06.08.2014 (06.08.2014)
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